How to Apply for a Temporary Resident Permit for Canada

 

What is a temporary resident permit?

A temporary resident permit is also called a visitor visa for Canada. It may also be referred to as a temporary resident visa, a temporary visa, a TRP or a TRV. You can obtain a single-entry temporary resident permit or a multiple entry temporary resident permit depending on your needs when you come to Canada to visit.

Do I need a temporary resident permit to come to Canada?

People from countries that are visa-exempt do not need a visitor visa or a temporary resident permit to come to Canada. The list of countries that do and do not need a temporary resident permit to come to Canada can be found here. http://www.visaplace.com/canada-immigration/temporary-residence-visitor-visa.php

However, there are a few exceptions to the lists. For example, United States citizens are visa-exempt and do not require a visa to come to Canada. They just have to show their proof of citizenship when they cross the border into Canada. But if the United States citizen who wants to come to Canada has a criminal record, they could be denied entry to Canada if they don’t obtain a temporary resident permit.

How to I apply for a temporary resident permit?

You can apply for a temporary resident permit to visit Canada at the US-Canada border or at the Canadian port of entry, such as an airport. However, if you are denied a temporary resident permit, you will have to turn around and leave. You can also apply for a temporary resident permit at your closest Canadian consulate.

When applying for a temporary resident permit to visit Canada, you need to be aware that you will have to show strong ties to your home country that would ensure you will not overstay your temporary resident permit. These can include family ties, employment ties and financial ties.

Have you been denied entry to Canada or need to obtain a temporary resident permit to visit Canada? Contact our immigration law firm. You are closer than you think!

Any information provided here does not constitute legal advice and is intended for general information only. Should you require legal advise, you are encouraged to contact a lawyer directly. All blog postings are public and are not subject to solicitor/client confidentially. Case results depend on a variety of factors unique to each case, and case results do not guarantee or predict a similar result in any further case undertaken by the lawyer.

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